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North Dakota

Trigger Law Statutory Cite(s)

Does this law have a potential impact on IVF/Reproductive medicine?

Why or why not?

  • Seemingly no impact on IVF or other ART procedures.
  • The trigger law defines abortion to mean “the use or prescription of any substance, device, instrument, medicine, or drug to intentionally terminate the pregnancy of an individual known to be pregnant.”
  • This applies to the termination of the pregnancy of a person who is known to be pregnant. 

Does this law explicitly reference IVF, assisted reproductive technology or reproductive medicine?

There are no explicit references to IVF or reproductive medicine services. 

Are there any penalties in this law that could apply to ART procedures?

The law does not appear to be applicable to ART procedures. 

Relevant definitions

  • Abortion” is defined as the “use or prescription of any substance, device, instrument, medicine, or drug to intentionally terminate the pregnancy of an individual known to be pregnant, but does not include “an act made with the intent to increase the probability of a live birth; preserve the life or health of a child after live birth; or remove a dead, unborn child who died as a result of a spontaneous miscarriage, an accidental trauma, or a criminal assault upon the pregnant female or her unborn child.”

Do the definitions/terms of the trigger law apply to other areas of state code?

The trigger law is part of the North D­­akota criminal code, but the definitions referenced only apply to the abortion section.

What is the “trigger” for this law to take effect?

The trigger law is effective when:

Key provisions: What does the law prohibit and when does it apply?

  • The law makes it a “class C felony for a person, other than the pregnant female upon whom the abortion was performed, to perform an abortion.”
  • Abortion is defined to mean “the use or prescription of any substance, device, instrument, medicine, or drug to intentionally terminate the pregnancy of an individual known to be pregnant.”
  • There are three affirmative defenses under the Act:
    • The “abortion was necessary in professional judgment and was intended to prevent the death of the pregnant female.” The section defines “[p]rofessional judgment” to mean “a medical judgment that would be made by a reasonably prudent physician who is knowledgeable about the case and the treatment possibilities with respect to the medical conditions involved.”
    • The “abortion was to terminate a pregnancy that resulted from gross sexual imposition, sexual imposition, sexual abuse of a ward, or incest, as those offenses are defined in­­ chapter 12.1-20.”
    • The individual “was acting within the scope of that individual’s regulated profession and under the direction of or at the direction of a physician.” A physician is defined as “an individual licensed to practice medicine” in North Dakota. This defense protects workers who work under physician delegation from liability for performing an abortion.

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