News & Publications

Headlines in Reproductive Medicine

The following links have been gleaned from current news to help keep you informed on reproductive medicine's impact on our world. Note:  Some newspapers and periodicals require free registration to access their online articles. The links on this page may expire within a week of posting; however, most news web sites keep online archives with articles offered either free or available for purchase. WARNING! THE ASRM HAS NOT REVIEWED THE CONTENTS OF THE EXTERNAL WEB SITES LISTED ON THIS PAGE, NOR CAN WE ENDORSE THEM OR THE VIEWS EXPRESSED WITHIN. 

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Black Women Fare Worse with Fertility Treatments

Headlines in Reproductive Medicine October 22, 2014

Black women undergoing in vitro fertilization (IVF) are only about half as likely as white women to become pregnant using the popular assisted reproduction technique, new research indicates, and the racial disparity persists even when donor eggs are used.

Could Plastics Ruin Your Sex Life?

Headlines in Reproductive Medicine October 22, 2014

Phthalates are found in numerous items around the home, and even in food packaging. So it’s a little worrying that they’re being linked to, among other things, a decrease in libido in women

Poll: 70% Favor Legalizing Over-The-Counter Birth Control

Headlines in Reproductive Medicine October 21, 2014

The latest Reason-Rupe poll finds 70 percent of Americans favor legalizing over-the-counter birth control pills and patches without a doctor’s prescription, 26 percent oppose such a proposal, and 4 percent don’t know enough to say. There has been a slight uptick in support for OTC birth control, rising from 66 percent in May of 2013. Moreover, Reason-Rupe finds that women across income groups highly support legalizing OTC birth control at about the same rates.

Chemicals in Plastic 'are Making Women Less Interested in Sex': Low Libido Linked to Additives Used to Soften Materials Found in Every Home

Headlines in Reproductive Medicine October 21, 2014

If you fancy a pint after work then this might be the perfect excuse. Because according to researchers, drinking a pint of beer a day doubles a man’s odds of becoming a father.

A Pint of Beer a Day 'Can Double Men's Fertility': But Coffee and Being Vegetarian Cuts Odds of Conceiving

Headlines in Reproductive Medicine October 21, 2014

If you fancy a pint after work then this might be the perfect excuse. Because according to researchers, drinking a pint of beer a day doubles a man’s odds of becoming a father.

Coffee Consumption Linked to Male Infertility, U.S. Study Suggests

Headlines in Reproductive Medicine October 21, 2014

Men who drank two or more cups of strong coffee a day had just a one in five chance of becoming fathers through IVF. However, for those who drank less than a cup, the chance of having a child rose to nearly 52%.

Yes, More U.S. Men Got Vasectomies in the Recession

Headlines in Reproductive Medicine October 21, 2014

During the great recession of 2007-2009, urologists across the country reported more men than usual getting vasectomies amid worries about supporting bigger families in tough times. Now data from a nationwide survey backs up those anecdotal reports: Vasectomy rates really did rise as the economy tanked.

Apple, Facebook Spring for Egg Freezing for Employees

Headlines in Reproductive Medicine October 15, 2014

Facing calls to diversify their largely white and male ranks, Facebook and Apple are offering their female employees a new perk: freezing their eggs.

Health-Care Company Looks to Increase Emergency Contraceptive Use by Cutting Price in Half

Headlines in Reproductive Medicine October 15, 2014

A health-care company founded last fall is looking to increase the number of women using emergency contraception (EC) in one simple way: by cutting its price in half.

Nigeria: Infertility Must Be Viewed As a Disease, Says Orhue

Headlines in Reproductive Medicine October 14, 2014

Despite the high rate of infertility in Africa, it has not received adequate attention from government because it is not considered as a disease, said Professor A. A. Orhue.

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